Hamlet analysis of soliloquy act i, scene ii, 129-159 essay

Hamlet's heart his broken and must not speak of his disgust in public.

hamlet soliloquy act 2 scene 2

The troubles Hamlet is experiencing must stay to himself because if he reveals his feelings aloud people may become suspicious to what he is planning. How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable Seem to me all the uses of this world! Claudius reminds Hamlet that he is next in line to the throne, and asks him not to return to school in Wittenberg, a request that Gertrude reiterates.

HoratioMarcellus, and Barnardo enter, and Hamlet, unguarded with Horatio as with no one else, snidely jokes that King Claudius has sought to save money by using the funeral refreshments to feed his wedding guests.

Line — Hamlet uses an apostrophe, speaking directly to "frailty. Hamlet believes that the garden is "unweeded [ The following literary devices are employed in the above soliloquy.

Hamlet soliloquies

He wants to commit suicide but respects that it is against the teachings of God. That it should come to this! According to them, the court could not afford excessive grief. In this example, flesh represents physical life. Line — Hamlet uses synechdoche, a special type of metaphor that uses a part to represent the whole or the whole to represent the parts. He bemoans the fact that he cannot commit suicide and explains in lines that "self-slaughter" is not an option because it is forbidden by God. Hamlet wishes his father was still alive since Hamlet describes him as a remarkable king. If the play did not have this soliloquy, the readers would be left to draw conclusions as to what was creating his depression. O God! The troubles Hamlet is experiencing must stay to himself because if he reveals his feelings aloud people may become suspicious to what he is planning. How weary, stale, flat and unprofitable, Seem to me all the uses of this world! Hamlet compares the Queen to Niobe immediately following his father's death, making her marriage to Claudius all the more despicable in Hamlet's eyes.

Line — Hamlet alludes to Niobe, a character in Greek mythology, famous for her ceaseless tears following her children's death.

Claudius is clearly the antagonist, and he begins his hour upon the stage in a blatantly adversarial role. He discusses how his mother not only didn't mourn for long, but she married her dead husband's own brother.

Though his emotions may seem to be those of an actor, he is not acting.

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Hamlet: Act I Scene 2 Summary & Analysis